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Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service logo Fruits and Vegetables Import Requirements (FAVIR)
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Commodity Import Report (CIR)

Tomato (Fruit, stem, calyx, and vine, as specified) from Chile into All Ports
The CIR contains current import regulation information for the selected Commodity Import (a specific commodity approved from a designated country, or region, into one or more designated ports). A flag ( Access Restricted to APHIS/CBP ) indicates information that is intended for and available to an APHIS/CBP audience only.
Solanum lycopersicum L. Commodity Summary Guide Page Country Summary

Active Alerts:
  Short Description    
ATTENTION: Mediterranean Fruit Fly Outbreak: Commodities from Quarantine Areas in Chile DETAILS  

 
Import Requirements
1 Admissible Plant Parts: Fruit, stem, calyx, and vine, as specified
2 Admissible Ports: All Ports
3 Import Permit Required: An Import Permit is required. To obtain a permit, go to e-Permits.
4 Subject to Inspection: This commodity is subject to inspection at the port of entry and all general requirements of 7 CFR 319.56-3.
5 Commercial Consignments Only
6 Federal Order: Federal Order DA-2015-42  (https://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/plants/plant_imports/federal_order/downloads/2015/DA-2015-42.pdf), issued July 31, 2015, effective immediately, and until further notice: consignments originating in Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata or Medfly) quarantine areas (refer to Federal Order) require an additional treatment in accordance with 7 CFR Part 305 or must originate in an area free of Medfly.
  6.1 Production Location: Mediterranean fruit fly (Ceratitis capitata) quarantine area
  6.2 Condition of Entry Treatment: T106-b (Vapor Heat) If tomato is pink or red, treatment is required from consignments grown, packed, or shipped from quarantine areas. Green tomatoes are exempt.
  6.3 Production Location: Not from any quarantine area.
  6.4 Phytosanitary Certificate: Must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) of the country of origin with an additional declaration stating the consignment was produced in an area free of Ceratitis capitata.

This additional declaration requirement is in addition to the additional declarations required by other provisions.
7 Pest Mitigation Strategy: Consignments must satisfy only one of the mitigation strategy options listed below.
8 Pest Mitigation Strategy: Option 1
  8.1 Pest Mitigation Strategy: Preclearance
  8.2 Preclearance Program: Must be accompanied by either a PPQ Form 203 or vessel report attesting to the consignment completing fumigation with T101-c-3-1.
9 Pest Mitigation Strategy: Option 2
  9.1 Pest Mitigation Strategy: APHIS-approved systems approach as stated on the phytosanitary certificate.
  9.2 Phytosanitary Certificate: The phytosanitary certificate must have two additional declarations stating:
  • Tomato fruit in the consignment was produced in accordance with an APHIS-approved systems approach, and was visually inspected and found free of Tuta absoluta
  • Tomatoes were grown in an approved production site in Chile
10 Packaging or Labeling Requirements: The shipping box must be labeled with the identity of the production site.
11 Reference Information: To be treated in accordance with the Plant Protection and Quarantine Treatment Manual (https://www.aphis.usda.gov/import_export/plants/manuals/ports/downloads/treatment.pdf).
Instructions for Officers
12 Refer to the Inspection Aid for Tuta absoluta (https://cbp.aphis.usda.gov/ppq/php/qpas/downloads/aqi/guidelines/PestBulletin-Tutaabsolutaver-4.0.pdf) for detailed inspection guidelines. restricted image
Commodity Information
13 For additional commodity information and images, visit https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxonomydetail.aspx?id=101442  
Additional Requirements
14

With treatment

The tomatoes must be treated in Chile with methyl bromide in accordance with 7 CFR Part 305. The treatment must be conducted in facilities registered with the National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) of Chile and with APHIS personnel monitoring the treatments;

The tomatoes must be treated and packed within 24 hours of harvest. Once treated, the tomatoes must be safeguarded by an insect-proof mesh screen or plastic tarpaulin while in transit to the packinghouse and awaiting packing. They must be packed in insect-proof cartons or containers, or insect-proof mesh or plastic tarpaulin under APHIS monitoring for transit to the airport and subsequent export to the United States. These safeguards must be intact upon arrival in the United States; and

Tomatoes may be imported into the United States from Chile with treatment in accordance with this section only if the NPPO of Chile has entered into a trust fund agreement with APHIS for that shipping season in accordance with § 319.56-6. This agreement requires the NPPO of Chile to pay in advance all costs APHIS estimates it will incur in providing the preclearance services prescribed in this section for that shipping season.

Systems approach

The tomatoes may be imported without fumigation for Tuta absoluta, Rhagoletis tomatis, and Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly, Ceratitis capitata) if they meet the following conditions:

The tomatoes must be grown in approved production sites that are registered with the NPPO of Chile. Initial approval of the production sites will be completed jointly by the NPPO of Chile and APHIS. The NPPO of Chile will visit and inspect the production sites monthly, starting 2 months before harvest and continuing until the end of the shipping season. APHIS may monitor the production sites at any time during this period.

Tomato production sites must consist of pest-exclusionary greenhouses, which must have double self-closing doors and have all other openings and vents covered with 1.6 mm (or less) screening.

The tomatoes must originate from an area that has been determined by APHIS to be free of Medfly in accordance with the procedures described in § 319.56-5 or an area where Medfly trapping occurs. Production sites in areas where Medfly is known to occur must contain traps for both Medfly and Rhagoletis tomatis in accordance with this section and the Registered production sites portion of this section. Production sites in all other areas do not require trapping for Medfly. The trapping protocol for the detection of Medfly in infested areas is as follows:

McPhail traps with an approved protein bait must be used within registered greenhouses. Traps must be placed inside greenhouses at a density of 4 traps/10 ha, with a minimum of at least 2 traps per greenhouse.

Medfly traps with trimedlure must be placed inside a buffer area 500 meters wide around the registered production site, at a density of 1 trap/10 ha and a minimum of 10 traps. These traps must be checked at least every 7 days. At least 1 of these traps must be near a greenhouse. Traps must be set for at least 2 months before export and trapping and continue to the end of the harvest season.

Medfly prevalence levels in the surrounding areas must be 0.7 Medflies per trap per week or lower. If levels exceed this before harvest, the production site will be prohibited from shipping under the systems approach. If the levels exceed this after the 2 months prior to harvest, the production site would be prohibited from shipping under the systems approach until APHIS and the NPPO agree the pest risk has been mitigated.

Registered production sites must contain traps for Rhagoletis tomatis in accordance with the following provisions:

McPhail traps with an approved protein bait must be used within registered greenhouses. Traps must be placed inside greenhouses at a density of 4 traps/10 ha, with a minimum of at least 2 traps per greenhouse. Traps inside greenhouses will use the same bait for Medfly and Rhagoletis tomatis because the bait used for R. tomatis is sufficient for attracting both types of fruit fly within the confines of a greenhouse; therefore, it is unnecessary to repeat this trapping protocol in production sites in areas where Medfly is known to occur.

McPhail traps with an approved protein bait must be placed inside a 500 meter buffer zone at a density of 1 trap/10 ha surrounding the production site. At least 1 of the traps must be near a greenhouse. Traps must be set for at least 2 months before export until the end of the harvest season and must be checked at least every 7 days. In areas where Medfly trapping is required, traps located outside of greenhouses must contain different baits for Medfly and Rhagoletis tomatis. There is only 1 approved bait for R. tomatis and the bait is not strong enough to lure Medfly when used outside greenhouses; therefore, separate traps must be used for each type of fruit fly present in the area surrounding the greenhouses.

If within 30 days of harvest a single Rhagoletis tomatis is captured inside the greenhouse or in a consignment or if 2 R. tomatis are captured or detected in the buffer zone, shipments from the production site will be suspended until APHIS and the NPPO determine risk mitigation is achieved.

Registered production sites must conduct regular inspections for Tuta absoluta throughout the harvest season and find these areas free of T. absoluta evidence (e.g., eggs or larvae). If within 30 days of harvest, 2 T. absoluta are captured inside the greenhouse or a single T. absoluta is found inside the fruit or in a consignment, shipments from the production site will be suspended until APHIS and the NPPO of Chile determine risk mitigation is achieved.

The NPPO of Chile will ensure that populations of Liriomyza huidobrensis inside greenhouses are well managed by performing inspections during the monthly visits specifically for L. huidobrensis mines in the leaves and for visible external pupae or adults. If L. huidobrensis is found to be generally infesting the production site, shipments from the production site will be suspended until APHIS and the NPPO of Chile agree risk mitigation is achieved.

All traps must be placed at least 2 months prior to harvest and be maintained throughout the harvest season and be monitored and serviced weekly.

The NPPO of Chile must maintain records of trap placement, checking of traps, and of any Rhagoletis tomatis or Tuta absoluta captures for 1 year for APHIS review. The NPPO of Chile must maintain an APHIS-approved quality control program to monitor or audit the trapping program. APHIS must be notified when a production site is removed from or added to the program.

The tomatoes must be packed within 24 hours of harvest in a pest-exclusionary packinghouse. The tomatoes must be safeguarded by a pest-proof screen or plastic tarpaulin while in transit to the packinghouse and while awaiting packing. Tomatoes must be packed in insect-proof cartons or containers or covered with insect-proof mesh or plastic tarpaulin for transit to the United States. These safeguards must remain intact until arrival in the United States.

During the time the packinghouse is in use for exporting fruit to the United States, the packinghouse may only accept fruit from registered approved production sites.

The NPPO of Chile is responsible for export certification inspection and issuance of phytosanitary certificates. Each consignment of tomatoes must be accompanied by a phytosanitary certificate issued by the NPPO of Chile with an additional declaration stating the tomatoes were grown in an approved production site in Chile.

Page ID: CIRReportP
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